Tag Archives: farming

Tribal Paradigm: lifestyle

25 Jun

Hi there!

In the emergence of a new paradigm which works for and elevates the human condition, we can adapt new modes and models to help understand humanity deeper and better. Once established, the model will easily fit most anyone who comes into it, and other methods (such as key-giving) could be used to deeper incorporate the people who show promise. These interface procedures deepen trust at the level of community. Deanne Bednar, of Strawbale Studio, said she likes to think of what did they do at the village and tribe, and how can we get closer to that. We are the generations dissatisfied with this myth of progress. We know the truth of history and the history of money. [link] Let’s come together and make a better system. Straight up.

Work Camp – it’s like, someone gives you a cigarette or a few afterwards.

It’s time to re-form our brain and do things for the other in clear places that are designated for work. Things like quality and time will be accounted for, and that’s righteous. Skilled craftspeople are held pretty highly in society.

http://ubuntuusa.com/about-us

There is no need for money in this society. We are in urban Detroit, where over 40% were unemployed before the revolution. Now, they are being led to freedom. I have been amazed at the spirit of ubuntu generosity I have experienced from everyone here already. If anything is to be made, it is right now made out of recycle stream, and soon when we capture a mine to be added as we can produce from source. Gas money. The steel for example is used to make sheets, for the HHO cells which free farmers for more quantity and variety, and to make secondary products via our bodega institute. Wood is all over the city which we can deconstruct houses for. Opening up houses can be good alternative work, or vocation. The land is free as the mother gave it, if there’s a building on it well, then someone might have just claim to that. For anyone in this labor force, it’s making the things that we want.

Free Camp – pizza recipe: bread, sauce, and oil. Satisfies the craving.

Gardening Camp – go there during the day, do a lot of stuff, gets a bag of weed.

Think about a new institute. This could do as many things as it wants to, as is manageable, and could be added to or removed from as demand goes. They want you to grow things. If you agree to voluntarily grow something for society, then you’ll be gifted the seeds and tools, and people will come help you set up.

Camp Corporate – would like a vodka drink of choice or bar environment

Advanced manufactured things are made in different shops around the city, to order, from the available institutes. As more things are freed across Michigan, we expect that more things will be made. If it’s something that comes from growing, let’s take up growing that thing in our greenhouses. Things that come in from outside are donated, are in-kind. Furthermore, membership includes free everything that anyone else makes. Note: you’ll have a free house with no bills, as well. Then we’ll get to the free store, as in the vision.

Village apprenticeships

Different shops are around to apprentice at, and creativity combines different requests, essential oils, and gets seeds ready. City government would provide all the necessary tools for your trade, in the meantime we use hackerspaces and the makerspace like the George Washington Library in Chicago. Education is passed on from wisdom that elders have learned, and they want something to do well that is take up teaching other kids in the neighborhood. We will have transitioned up to 4 schools in Eastern detroit which were shut down when there was no money, and now with the city’s permission they do not use money nor train people for a society with it.

Space Age Free Future: One in which no currency is used, rather the full spectrum of humanity is known in those that you would deal with or know and love.

Institutes for the Future

Visit Fireweed

Ed Che on Twitter

Alternative Vocation

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Absolutely Crucial : BioChar and Mycorrhizae PDF

5 May

http://www.dyarrow.org/BiocharAndMycorrhizae.pdf

David Yarrow
dyarrow5@gmail.com
785-260-6272
http://www.dyarrow.org
http://dyarrow.blogspot.com/

http://www.facebook.com/dyarrow5
http://www.carbon-negative.us
http://www.nutrient-dense.info
http://www.ancientforests.us
http://www.seaagri.com
http://www.onondagavesica.info

An Open letter to Wendell Berry, US Government

23 May

Dear Wendell,
I have a dream; and, at its center, you stand– tall, humble, simply magnificent. Despite all my reservations about writing to you, here I am, hours before dawn, doing something that I could not even have dared to imagine only last evening.

I awoke with a dream long before the sun is scheduled to shine. In this dream, I join millions reading your open letter to the White House, courteously requesting $5 billion– a tiny pittance compared to the going rate for government bailouts– to regenerate 50 million family farms; $5 billion, in other words, that could support young people who have the gumption and a sense of adventure necessary to grow food and sequester carbon in the soil; $5 billion that would allow American women, men, and their families a chance to eat and grow clean, uncontaminated, uncancerous food.

Your moral stature and vision are such that all you would have to do is write such an open letter to the president to more fully awaken millions; to start a groundswell.

My dream declared itself loud and clear as soon as I rolled out of bed– perhaps the time is right. It’s been a long time coming, Wendell. Your half-century-old patience, my dream declares, may finally be paying off. Your time, the Wendell Berry Era, has finally dawned. Hopefully.

People might now be ready to embrace your vision, holding it close to their hearts while abandoning the illusions foisted upon us by recent elections and by corporate admen and those in cahoots with them. My dream declares boldly that not only your grassroots fans in the millions are ready to savor your wisdom, but that others, who may not have heard of you nor studied your writings, are world-weary of hokey hope and industrial illusions, and are ready as well. We find ourselves genuinely scared of the triple crises of climate collapse, resource depletion, and inequality, which we have all colluded in creating, and, at long last, are able to hear your words with an openness to surprise.

Your long patience with all of us during the past half-century reminds me of the 50-year-old patience of Gandhi. Gandhi had a dream of walking unarmed towards Ahimsa freedom, symbolize by taking back from the Empire India’s salt– the original birthright of its people. Gandhi’s tiny coterie of conspirators marching to the ocean to harvest their salt was the most powerful 20th-century gesture of the powerless spurning brute force.

If Hindus in the heyday of the British global economy could exercise the audacity of harvesting salt by the side of their beloved Gandhi, then what stops us from shaking off the shackles with which Monsanto, ADM, Cargill, and their governmental gang bind us? What stops us from harvesting our own food, nourishing our communities, audaciously enjoying the pleasures of eating?

Wendell, it is clearly outrageous of me to ask anything of you over and above the many gifts you have brought into my life. Following in your footsteps, learning lessons given to us by many of your loving fans– including the likes of Ivan Illich, Michael Pollan, and Barbara Kingsolver– I find myself still very compelled to write to you from my small world.

The time has come to listen to you and your kindred spirits.

Your era is our era.
We are ready.
Affectionately,
Madhu

Copywright information:
Madhu Suri Prakash, contributing editor of Yes Magazine. Wendell Berry is farmer, activist, novelist, essayist, poet. This is transposed from the Summer issue of Yes! Magazine. Other stories and an overview of the issue of Yes! can be found on their website: http://www.yesmagazine.org/issues/beyond-prisons or twitter.com/

Local in Boston, Part 1

15 Jan

Need fresh produce around Boston? It’s not only healthier to eat closer to the food chain, it’s also more sustainable and personally rewarding. Treat yourself, because this is about to be good:

I just got back from a unique and one-of-a-kind alternative wholesale grocery store. Russo and Sons, located in Watertown, is a generations-old farm market turned unique distribution for retailers and consumers.

It has a unique feel from the start with the larger shipping bays. I count six cargo bays, packed with trucks owned by Russo (12′) and one or two that are contracted out to a larger service. Pallets of produce from local farms and, yes, I spotted a Dole case, are unloaded here to the side of the building, which has the basic wrapping and processing needed. Three of the docks are occupied by rental freezer storage units, which extend the size and storage capacity of the main area.

Russo and Sons
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